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Nutritional MYTHS

Do you also believe in nutritional myths?

(Myth Busters)

Myths, myths, myths… The list is pretty long then, so wrong. But what’s right? What can you believe?

Well, this has been the confusion for decades, which started from street gossips and have evolved into “WHATSAPP FORWARDS”. It becomes a heck of a decision on what to believe and what not to.

Quoting Shakespeare in a sarcastic way, “TO BELIEVE OR NOT TO BELIEVE, THAT IS THE QUESTION”

So, here are all such myths, and are on our way to bust them today. Within the next few minutes, we will learn the facts behind the age-old myths.

IN TODAY’S ARTICLE OF MYTH BUSTERS, FOOD, AND NUTRITION MYTHS! BUSTED!

Let’s start right away with the first nutritional myth.

Myth 1: Those with diabetes have to give up sweets.

Fact:

In moderation, an occasional sweet treat is fine. The key to maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is balancing meals and snacks to supply a mix of carbs, fats, and proteins, and using exercise and drugs to stay blood sugar under control.

Many of them completely quit sweets when detected with diabetes, but the truth is that a sweet here and there is allowed. This brings us to the second one.

Myth 2: Vitamin C can keep you from catching a cold

Fact:

Research has shown that vitamin C generally does not ward off colds, but it may be helpful in people who participate in extreme physical exercise. A 2019 study within the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition found ingesting a pill of vitamin C, or vitamin C, before one bout of exercise suppressed SOD activity, a marker of stress within the body, among participants who took the pill, compared with those that ingested a placebo. However, the researchers are unclear on the efficacy of vitamin C supplementation on exercise-induced oxidative stress.

So, it is uncertain that Vitamin C can help you not catch a cold, but it isn’t completely true as well. Moving on to the next nutritional myths,

Myth 3: Avoid eggs because of their cholesterol content.

Fact:

Eggs have gotten an unfounded bad rap; in a 2018 study in the journal Nutrients, researchers found eggs don’t actually contribute to high cholesterol. In fact, eggs are a cheap source of many nutrients, including zinc and iron, antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, vitamin D, and therefore the brain-boosting chemical choline. However, keep in mind that the research on eggs has gone back and forth over the years so don’t overdo it. The American Heart Association says one whole egg or two egg whites a day can be part of a healthy diet. Keep cholesterol in check by monitoring saturated fat in your diet.

We have been listening to this from our childhood. The truth is that eggs don’t much contribute to high cholesterol. Next one along your way,

Myth 4: Spicy food gives you an ulcer

Fact:

Spices don’t trigger ulcers. We now know that a selected sort of bacteria, Helicobacter pylori, causes most ulcers, except those triggered by certain medications, like aspirin. What spices can do is exacerbate those problems, which can cause people to mistakenly believe that spices cause ulcers.

So, the culprit is the bacteria. The spices don’t actually cause ulcers but help to make the situation worse. Hence, do have spices, but keep some control over them as well.

Myth 5: Eating celery (leafy vegetable) burns more calories than you take in.

Fact:

It’s a food myth that celery has “negative” calories, according to the Mayo Clinic. But, with less than 10 calories per serving and plenty of fiber, it’s a great snack for maintaining a healthy weight. Try these healthy snacks that may help boost your weight loss.

There’s nothing like the concept of negative calories, but it is the fiber that aids weight loss.

The next one,

Myth 6: Raw carrots are more nutritious than cooked

Fact: Antioxidants could also be enhanced when some vegetables are cooked. for instance, during a 2008 study within the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, researchers found cooking carrots actually increases their nutritional value. Boiling carrots led carotenoids (antioxidants) to extend by 14 percent, while other cooking methods, especially frying, led to a decrease in antioxidant value.

Cooking tends to reinforce antioxidants sometimes. Be it raw or cooked, veggies are always healthy. this is just the most believed nutritional myth.

Image result for nutrition myths and facts

Myth 7: Coffee stunts your growth.

Fact:

Coffee doesn’t stunt your growth. consistent with Healthline, a study tracked 81 women aged 12–18 for 6 years. It found no difference in bone health between those that had the very best daily caffeine intake, compared to those with rock bottom. Therefore, caffeine doesn’t have any positive correlation with calcium absorption.

Coffee lovers, it’s a treat for you. there’s no harm to your growth, but an excessive amount of it can cause insomnia (lack of sleep). Drink wisely.

Myth 8: frozen dessert is bad for the throat.

Fact:

It’s not quite clear where this myth originated — possibly from a nasty case of brain freeze! actually, the precise opposite is true, and frozen dessert has long been revered as a remedy for sore throats. frozen dessert also can often help to scale back mouth inflammation and is consistently recommended for those that recently got their tonsils removed. The soothing chilliness of the frozen dessert helps numb the world altogether and provides some comforting and delicious relief.

Shocked, right? So were we, once we found this online. That’s the rationale we are reaching bent you in order that no more myths are spread.

Myth 9: Carbonated drinks are bad for you

Fact:

A sodium-free seltzer with a wedge of lemon or lime quenches your thirst without hurting your health. Soda, on the opposite hand, will contribute to health problems when consumed in excess, including weight gain, cavities, and high vital sign, consistent with the middle for Science within the Public Interest

The drinks without can be preferred to quench your thirst with no effects on health.

This brings us to the end of today’s article with various nutritional myths. We’ve busted 9 nutritional myths today. Tell, us which one shocked you the foremost within the comment section below.

THANK YOU!

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