Skip to content

A Fragile World

A Fragile World is a captivating and illustrative documentary about climate change, made by Planet Doc Full Documentaries. This documentary video enlightens the most dominant species on Earth, Homo Sapiens, and how our greed for a sumptuous life has already resulted in climate change and how it has impacted and still affecting biodiversity. We are the only species that, instead of adapting to its surroundings, is capable of altering them to adapt them to our needs, and this has turned us into the greatest threat to our planet.

Our species is experiencing unstoppable growth, and we are changing the world, adapting it to our needs, altering our natural parameters.  What began as small refinements have turned into drastic changes on a worldwide scale that are making entire ecosystems disappear, extinguishing species, and changing the composition and properties of our atmosphere. There are millions of us all seeking food, shelter, and benefits from the land and the water. The majority of the human population is poor and lives in under-developed and developing countries and so has no time to worry about environmental problems deriving from their activity.

Deforestation: Before and After

Deforestation has consequences beyond land biodiversity. Forests are responsible for equatorial rain and their existence directly affects the water, climate, and the atmosphere. And nonetheless, man ceaselessly and blindly continues to destroy his benefactor. Today, only 6% area of tropical forest is left on Earth which is home to half the species known to us. We have already lost 60% of temperate and mixed forest, 45% of rainforest is now wasteland and 70% of dry tropical forest have been lost.

Deforestation results in the loss of thousands of species, many of them unknown. When a species disappears it takes with it substances that could have given us medicines that could have cured deadly diseases. Natives of tropical forest are natural encyclopedia of the natural pharmacopeia of the forest, they know the secrets of thousands of species. Although, they do not have it in writing but pass it from generation to generation orally. When we cut down forests, these natives disappear resulting in the loss of invaluable knowledge. We, who are responsible for this devastation have very little time to avoid further disaster.

We have all become dependent on constantly growing energy consumption. We have learned how to obtain and use energy, but we have no clue about how to treat the toxic waste generated by an incomplete process. At first, we did not think this contamination was important, but the unstoppable increase in contaminating emissions is poisoning our world so much that its fabulous self-cleaning processes are unable to cope. Our climate is gradually heating up, the glaciers are retreating, the poles are melting.

Melting Glaciers

We are changing the world, altering ecosystems, changing landscapes, wiping out species at a speed ten thousand times faster than that required by nature to make new creatures of Earth. We use and upset the natural balances and in time when we want to correct it, we realize just how complex the natural balance we have altered.

When people began to comprehend how important it is to conserve biodiversity they started making national parks and sanctuaries. Yellow Stone National Park, 1st national park in the world created to save the flora and fauna. But how naive human beings are, in order to protect one species, they wiped out another one. Wolf, the only predator of buffalo, to protect the species of buffalo they killed wolves. However, as they realized their mistake and recognize how important wolves are for a healthy population of buffalo, grey wolves are thrusted back.

We have reached the cultural, moral, and scientific development that is pivotal for us to rectify our mistakes. Wings of Hope are starting to blow in the fragile world that needs the help of homo sapiens, the same species that has left it wounded.

Source: A Fragile World – documentary

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: